• Controllers, Drive Your Professional Development: Attend CHCC 2018

    Club and hotel controllers: Do not miss the opportunity to get behind the wheel and take control of your own professional development. The Club and Hotel Controllers Conference (CHCC) — co-located with the world’s largest hospitality technology show HITEC® Houston at the George R.

  • Job Description Template: Club Accounting Positions

    The HFTP Americas Research Center has developed example job descriptions for club accounting positions. The process involved reviewing sample job descriptions, and compiling the information into standardized job descriptions.

  • Job Description Template: Club IT Positions

    The HFTP Americas Research Center has developed example job descriptions for club IT positions. The process involved reviewing sample job descriptions, and compiling the information into standardized job descriptions.

  • A Room for Robots in Hospitality

    Realistic uses for artificial intelligence are increasing, making way for machine-based assistance in accounting, marketing, customer service and more. This feature details current scenarios where robotics is used in the business environment, such as for accounting tasks.

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Harassment and the #MeToo Movement in the Private Club Industry

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·16 May 2018
The recent heightened awareness to sexual harassment issues affects a wide range of industries, and has prompted employers to consider ways to get ahead of the problem. In order to reduce the risk of such complaints, private clubs may take a number of proactive steps.
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Recent Trends in State and Local Wage and Hour Laws

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·14 May 2018
Our colleagues Jeffrey H. Ruzal, Adriana S. Kosovych, and Judah L. Rosenblatt, attorneys in the Employment, Labor & Workforce Management practice, co-authored an article in Club Director, titled “Recent Trends in State and Local Wage and Hour Laws.”
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Industry Spotlights Webinar Series: Legal Issues Hospitality Employers Should Be Considering This Year

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·10 May 2018
So far, 2018 has brought an increasing number of labor and employment rules and regulations. To help you stay up to date, we are pleased to introduce the Employment, Labor & Workforce Management Webinar Series.
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New EEOC Commentary on Workplace Harassment

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog· 7 May 2018
Last week, the EEOC released its latest edition of its federal sector Digest of Equal Opportunity Law, a quarterly publication featuring recent Commission decisions and federal court cases selected by EEOC’s Office of Federal Operations. This edition features an article titled, “Promising Practices for Preventing Harassment,” which is the fruition of an EEOC task force on workplace harassment. The article, which is particularly timely given the #MeToo movement, advances five core principles to deter and remedy harassment: (1) committed and engaged leadership; (2) consistent and demonstrated accountability; (3) strong and comprehensive harassment policies; (4) trusted and accessible complaint procedures; and (5) regular, interactive training tailored to the audience and the organization.

Massachusetts Employers' Ability to Inquire into Job Applicants' Criminal History Further Curbed

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·23 April 2018
Massachusetts employers should take note of a provision in the Massachusetts criminal justice reform law – signed into law last week – that amends the type and scope of questions an employer may ask an applicant about his or her criminal history following an “initial written employment application.”
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Ninth Circuit's Decision Holds That Salary History Is Not a Defense to Equal Pay Claims

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·13 April 2018
The federal Equal Pay Act (“EPA”) mandates equal pay for equal work regardless of sex. Employers that pay men and women different wages for the same work are strictly liable for violations of the EPA unless they can show that one or more of four exceptions apply to explain the wage disparity. The four statutory exceptions are seniority, merit, the quantity or quality of the employee’s work, or “any other factor other than sex.” The Ninth Circuit recently took up the question of the meaning of the fourth, catchall exception – “any factor other than sex” – in order to consider whether an employer may rely, in whole or in part, on an employee’s prior salary as a basis for explaining a pay differential in Aileen Rizo v. Jim Yovino.

Congress Rejects Part of the DOL's Proposed Tip-Pooling Rule - Employment Law This Week

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·10 April 2018
Under the recently signed Consolidated Appropriations Act, Congress has amended the FLSA to address tip pools. The amendment prohibits employers from keeping employees’ tips or distributing any portion of the tips to managers or supervisors. Non-tipped, back-of-the-house employees, like cooks and dishwashers, may participate in tip pools when the employer pays at least the minimum wage and does not take a tip credit. The amendment also provides for enhanced damages and penalties when employees are deprived of tips.
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FJC Publishes New Protocols: Initial Discovery Protocols For Fair Labor Standards Act Cases Not Pleaded As Collective Actions

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·29 March 2018
Our colleagues Adriana S. Kosovych and Jeffrey H. Ruzal, at Epstein Becker Green, have a post on the Wage and Hour Defense Blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “Initial Discovery Guidelines May Fast-Track Early Disclosure Requirements in Individual FLSA Cases.”
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New Jersey Supreme Court Clarifies Exceptions to the Unemployment Compensation Law's Disqualification Rule for Voluntarily Leaving Employment

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·19 March 2018
New Jersey Unemployment Compensation Law (N.J.S.A. 43:21-4) provides that an unemployed individual who meets an earnings and employment duration threshold is eligible to receive unemployment benefits if he or she “is able to work, and is available for work, and . . . actively seeking work.” An individual’s eligibility for benefits is subject to disqualification conditions outlined in N.J.S.A. 43:21-5.
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Six Circuit Finds Discrimination On the Basis of Gender Identity Violates Title VII

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·12 March 2018
Our colleagues Nathaniel M. Glasser and Amanda M. Gómez, at Epstein Becker Green, have a post on the Health Employment and Labor blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “Sixth Circuit Finds Title VII Covers Discrimination Based on Transgender Status.”
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Appeals Court Rules That Civil Rights Act Prohibits Anti-Gay Discrimination - Employment Law This Week

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog· 9 March 2018
Featured on Employment Law This Week: Second Circuit: Title VII Covers Sexual Orientation Discrimination. “Legal doctrine evolves.” Those words from the Second Circuit spoke volumes as the court ruled that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibits sexual orientation discrimination, overturning their own long-standing precedent. The court ruled in favor of a skydiving instructor who claimed he was fired for telling a client he was gay.
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Cyberlaw Update: How U.S. Companies Should Prepare for the GDPR

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog· 8 March 2018
Our colleague Stuart M. Gerson at Epstein Becker Green has a post on the Technology Employment Law blog that will be of interest to our readers in the hospitality industry: “The GDPR Soon Will Go Into Effect, and U.S. Companies Have to Prepare.”

Sexual Harassment Allegations Lead to Shareholder Lawsuits - Employment Law This Week

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·27 February 2018
Last month on Employment Law This Week, you heard that sexual misconduct allegations would start impacting shareholder value and reputation. Well, now we’ve got a case study in Wynn Resorts. After the Wall Street Journal uncovered multiple sexual misconduct allegations against Casino mogul Steve Wynn, the company’s stock fell nearly 20%. Wynn resigned a week later, but the company’s troubles were far from over. The company’s stock has lost $3 billion in value. The first shareholder lawsuit was filed the day Wynn resigned, and to date three suits by shareholders claim that Wynn and the Board breached their fiduciary duties to the company and its shareholders. Bill Milani, from Epstein Becker Green, has more.

Federal Judge Rules GrubHub Driver Is Independent Contractor - Employment Law This Week

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·22 February 2018
Featured on Employment Law This Week: A California federal judge has ruled that a former GrubHub delivery driver was an independent contractor, not an employee. The judge found that the company did not have the required control over its drivers for the plaintiff to establish that he is an employee. This decision comes as companies like Uber and Lyft are also facing lawsuits that accuse them of misclassifying employees as independent contractors. Carlos Becerra, from Epstein Becker Green, has more.

2017 Wrap-Up & Heads-Up: The Top Workforce Management Issues of 2017

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·27 December 2017
As 2017 comes to a close, recent headlines have underscored the importance of compliance and training. In this Take 5, we review major workforce management issues in 2017, and their impact, and offer critical actions that employers should consider to minimize exposure:
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NLRB Reverses Key Rulings on Joint-Employer Status and Handbooks, Rules & Policies - More Changes Coming

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·15 December 2017
Our colleague Steven M. Swirsky at Epstein Becker Green has a post on the Management Memo blog that will be of interest to our readers: “NLRB Reverses Key Rulings: Returns to Pre-Obama Board Test for Deciding Joint-Employer Status and for Determining Whether Handbooks, Rules and Policies Violate the NLRA – Assessment of 2014 Expedited Election Rules and Future Changes Also Announced.”

Proposed Bill Would Amend State and Local Paid Sick Leave Laws

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·13 November 2017
Our colleagues Susan Gross Sholinsky, Nancy Gunzenhauser Popper, and Judah L. Rosenblatt, at Epstein Becker Green, have a post on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality� industry: 'Proposed Federal Bill Would Pre-Empt State and Local Paid Sick Leave Laws.' Following is an excerpt: On November 2, 2017, three Republican Representatives, Mimi Walters (R-CA), Elise Stefanik (R-NY), and Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), introduced a federal paid leave bill that would give employers the option of providing their employees a minimum number ... Continue Reading Continue Reading...

Part C of the 'ABC' Independent Contractor Test Does Not Require an Independent Business

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog· 3 November 2017
Our colleagues Patrick G. Brady and James J. Sawczyn, at Epstein Becker Green, have a post on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “New Jersey’s Appellate Division Finds Part C of the “ABC” Independent Contractor Test Does Not Require an Independent Business”

California Governor Splits the Difference on Equal Pay Follow-On Laws

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·23 October 2017
For the second time in as many years, California Governor Jerry Brown has vetoed “wage shaming” legislation that would have required employers with 500 or more employees to report gender-related pay gap statistics to the California Secretary of State on an annual basis beginning in 2019 for publication on a public website. Assembly Bill 1209 (“AB 1209”), which we discussed at length in last month’s Act Now advisory, passed the Legislature despite widespread criticism from employers and commerce groups.
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Plan Sponsors: Potential Targets for IRS Compliance Examinations

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·11 October 2017
Our colleague Sharon L. Lippett, at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Financial Services Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “Plan Sponsors: Potential Targets for IRS Compliance Examinations.”

Ninth Circuit Rejects DOL's '80/20 Rule' On Sidework And Tipped Employees

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog· 7 September 2017
Yesterday, the Ninth Circuit issued its opinion in cases involving the Department of Labor’s (“DOL”) “80/20 Rule” regarding what is commonly referred to as “sidework” in the restaurant industry. Agreeing with the arguments made by our new colleague Paul DeCamp, among others, the Ninth Circuit issued a decidedly employer-friendly decision. In so doing, it disagreed with the Eighth Circuit, potentially setting the issue up for resolution by the United States Supreme Court.
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Motion to Dismiss Website Accessibility Complaint Denied by the Eastern District of New York

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog· 8 August 2017
Our colleague Joshua A. Stein, a Member of the Firm at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “Start Spreading the News – EDNY Denies Motion to Dismiss Website Accessibility Complaint.”
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Website Accessibility Lawsuits Continue as The ADA Turns 27

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·26 July 2017
Our colleague Joshua A. Stein, a Member of the Firm at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “As the ADA Turns 27, Recent Developments Suggest No End to Website Accessibility Lawsuits.”

Latest ADA Decision Gives Businesses Another Reason to Consider Their Website's Accessibility

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·23 June 2017
Our colleague Joshua A. Stein, a Member of the Firm at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “Latest Website Accessibility Decision Further Marginalizes the Viability of Due Process and Primary Jurisdiction Defenses.”

New York City Mayor Signs 'Fair Workweek' Bills - Employment Law This Week

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·15 June 2017
Mayor Bill de Blasio has signed a package of bills into law limiting scheduling flexibility for fast-food and retail employers. New York City is the third major city in the United States, after San Francisco and Seattle, to enact this kind of legislation. The bills require fast-food employers to provide new hires with good-faith estimates of the number of hours that they will work per week and to pay workers a premium for scheduling changes made less than 14 days in advance.
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ADA Trial Verdict Is Not Good for Places of Public Accommodation

Hospitality Labor and Employment Law Blog·14 June 2017
Our colleague Joshua A. Stein, a Member of the Firm at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Retail Labor and Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the hospitality industry: “Nation’s First Website Accessibility ADA Trial Verdict Is In and It’s Not Good for Places of Public Accommodation.”

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